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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
, that we actually had a formula for success in this country. one, we educate our people up to and beyond what the technology was, so they can get the most out of it. whether it was universal secondary education, and then it was universal post secondary education. second, we have the world's best infrastructure. roads, railroads, third, we have the world's most immigration policy. so we get the most energy etic and talented im-- energetic and talented immigration. fourth, we have the best rules. lastly, we have the most government-funded research. we push the balance on science and technology, so our best innovators are here. in education, we now, well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to ld the world in college graduates. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers, we are now $2 trillion in deficits in terms of infrastructure. a great education, and get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on each one of these issues that are so vital to our greatest strength. i don't think we can remedy this .
jobs outdate faster and spin off new jobs. and they each one requires more education. and i just think if we're going it i think america is a huge advantage in the world. because the i think the world is going to be divided going forward between high imagination and enabling countries and low imagination enabling country. rethe highest imagination enabling country in the world. if you have spark of an idea you can go to delta in taiwan they'll design it. they'll get you a cheap chinese manufacture. amazon will gift wrap it for christmas. free lancer get the logo. they are commodities except this. that's no country that does better. the problem with this though, the days will ford will move to your job with 25,000 person factory is over. it's 2500 people and a lot of robots and you know the old joke, the modern factory of the future is two employees, a man and the dog. the man is there to feed the dog and the dog there to keep the man away from the machines. generating 12 million nor jobs maybe it's possible only going to be possible if we once again get everyone starting something. so
into the educational contexts and you're talking about mobile on its part farm, and a lot of this access to the broadbent for mobile devices and minority communities in particular, i do not view that as and the acceptable substitute for a laptop or desktop. >> comcast david cohen on the cable industry. monday at 8:00 eastern on c-span 2. campaign stop in appleton. this was her second visit to wisconsin in a little more than a month. it's half an hour. [cheers] >> thank you so much! yes, i'm very excited to be with you all today. i want to start by thanking eli for that very kind introduction for everything he's doing for this campaign. i want to thank a couple of -- one more person as well. i want to recognize former senator russ feingold. [cheers] thank you for everything you've done for this state and everything that he's doing for the campaign here in wisconsin. and most of all, i want to thank all of you, especially all the students here at lawrence university. thanks for being here. yes! yes! now, you all seem pretty fired up and ready to go. [cheers] and that's great because i'm fe
to lead us in an all- out search to advance our education, our learning, and our science and training, because this world is more complex and we're being pressed harder all the time. i believe in opening doors. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday
. borrowing, not to invest in hospitals and education and hospitals, but want to keep people idle. so the next time you heard a conservative say to you, labour would increase borrowing, just remember, it is this a government that is increasing borrowing this year. [applause] so what have we seen? we have seen recession, higher unemployment, higher borrowing. i don't think that's what people were promised. now look, there will be some people who say, and this as an important argument, a single people say there is a short term pain, but it is worth it for the long-term gain. but i'm afraid the opposite is true. you see, the longer you have low growth in our country, the bigger the death toll becomes for the future, and the bigger our problem will be in the future. the longer a young person is out of work, that's not just that for the prospects now. it's bad for the prospect the whole of the rest of their life. into a small business goes under during the recession, it can't just get up and running again during a recovery. so when david cameron says to you, well, let's just carry on as we are and
pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the factory of the universal secondary education and it was universal post secondary education to the extent that we could do that. we have the world's best infrastructure, bandwidth etc. then we had the world's most open and the sentry half century to increase the most energetic and talented around the world to start 40% of the new countries in silicon valley and the best rules for the capitol formation to prevent the recklessness and incentivize risk-taking. and last we had the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of c
gue went through a lot of research and points to non- college educated white women as a group that has moved some in the last couple of weeks. non-college educated white men are a no-fly zone for the president. but the women were up for grabs. have you noticed anything like that? is that a metric you are looking at? >> it is. everybody talks about the women's vote. there are a number of factors. people do not realize this -- john mccain won white women by seven points. that is not enough to win overall. obviously, he lost by seven points. when you look at white women voters, there are groups that are more likely to vote republican. those include white women without college degrees, white women who are married, and women with children. when you look at the differences between white women who are married and white women who are single, whether it be they are not married, they are widowed, or they are divorced, those groups vote overwhelmingly for obama. if ron is right and the president is making gains with non-college educated white women, that is problematic for our side. i have not se
. they boenlt have a high degree of education and both knowledgebling. i think we're lucky to have two great people running in the elections, especially given how they are. >> you have all these investments around america and increedingly around the world. what is your sense of the american economy? there are some signs that the economy is actually beginning to recover. housing is back. but yet the actual gdp numbers don't seem to move much. what do you think? >> there are some good sighs. housing has moved back a little bit. we've had a boon in energy. so -- and consumers have paid down a lot of debt. the bad side is there's an increasing government debt at the state and federal level. if you think back in 1982 this was a large outcry when the national debt passed 1 trillion. we're now adding 1 trillion per euro. soon the interest of the national debt could equal the whole amount in 1982 when you and i were here. i think it's a huge problem and a real problem. i'm hopeful that when the government forms that cob will address this problem. we've had such a polarized cob. that's part of the wh
of battalion and above. so basically we continue the strategy to train and educate afghan security forces. there's no train-- attempt at strategy. >> rose: when the french going out? >> well, some of them have left already. some of the combat troops. but i have to add the french stay committed. they continue to contribute in different ways. among other things they contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan. >> rose: but combat soldiers will be leaving by the end of 2013? >> actually by the end of this year. so they are in the process now of withdrawing but they still contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan so they stay committed until the end of 2014. >> rose: it's a presence but not a combat presence then. >> the same goes for the coalition partners. we have different tasks within and some people contribute trainers, others contribute combat troops. >> rose: okay. at the beginning of 2014 how many nations will do you think will be contributing combat troops? >> we don't know yet because that will very much depend on the security situation on the ground.
figuring that out sooner. in fact, by thiing about where you want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] dayquil doesn't treat that. huh? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus rushes relief to all your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... if we want to improve our schoo
'll educational background up being -- end up being, because we are run by people globe know what they're doing issues we'll be the only nation that gives. >> gretchen: i got bad news for you, you're going to be taxed 1% tax on billionaires around the world. that's part of this whole deal. >> i can imagine the people that are going to distribute the money. i've seen the people. i have buildings over there. i see them all the time. you should see the people that are going to be distributing these trillions of dollars. when you do and when you talk ty don't know what they're doing, you're not going to want to give your money too quickly. >> steve: if sounds like the united nations is continuing fair share, we heard hillary talk about how people around the world need to pay up more, more their fair share going forward. >> you know, we've been doing that for a long time of the we've been doing that for many years and right now we owe $17 trillion. so that's where it's gotten us. we really would qualify. i think we should get somebody very smart in there. we would qualify to receive money. not give
to educate the public so they understand how the process is posed to work -- supposed to work, and it's a big red flag when the process isn't going that way. the demand has to come from both sides, i think. >> i agree. ultimately, that's the only thing you can rely on. rules reform is incredibly important, and we put a lot of effort into it, but it's all wave bl, as hugh said. the majority can change at any time, so the thing that keeps the rules from changing constantly is public expectations about norms and what's appropriate and what isn't. that's why we didn't go crazy about the 72-hour thing. i keep putting up a blog post that has boehner promising 72 hours, but it is a big shift that says we are going to hold ourselves to that. the one reliable thing here is norms in a democracy for how things should function, and even the best rule is waiveable. i will choose clear expectations over clear rules any day, i guess, is my point. >> and i think it's worth, you know, the concern i off have is -- i often have is do the members know what they're voting to waive. and this is where there's a rul
want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing a reason...to look twice. introducing a stunning work of technology -- the entirely new lexus es. and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. and the first-ever es hybrid. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> loaded guns on a commercial plane. coming up, how the firearm
at ohio over here. 10.6% unemployment. gradually over the next few years we saw jobs come on and education and in health care and in business services and retail. and now look where we are today. every state that is lighter in color is where there are either no longer losing jobs or in most cases gaining jobs. ohio, 7.2% unemployment now. that is better than the national average. the bureau of labor statistics says to make that happen we had to create a lot of jobs. how many? by their count, 4.4 million so far. but here's what's not mentioned much, 4.3 million were lost during the bad days. so the net gain is only about 125,000 jobs. that falls short of the president's claim he created five million jobs. it's just a little bit too much of a stretch. we have to call that claim false. even though many democrats will say in a heartbeat, look, he inherited a bad economy from george bush. many voters agree with that, nonetheless, the numbers don't add up. what about mitt romney's claim about 23 million people unemployed though? we need context to consider. let me bring tools up her to talk abou
teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. the wheels of progress. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >>> you see the quote here, i was a monster. the words of the only surviving d.c. area sniper from behind bars at this maximum security prison, lee boyd malvo spoke with the washington post about what he has learned since he and john allen muhammad went on a murder spree, one of the most notorious killing sprees this nation has ever seen in washington, d.c. and its suburbs. it happened ten years ago this month. and the two men killed ten people, hurt three more, including a 13-year-old, and created widespread fear that if you walked out your door that day, you could die. >> everybody is scared. we'r
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)